There must be something in the water

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First I saw a group of grungy hipsters doing it on a rooftop in Dalston, then I noticed a guy, alone on Shoreditch Highstreet with some, and before I know it MB’s Ellen and I were irrationally demanding enough for the both of us from an innocent shopkeeper round the corner from Moving Brands.

This is not the latest incantation of Miaow-miaow, this is Perrier Water. The fizzy water made into a highly desirable “it” drink by Leo Burnett back in 1979. In a recent BBC documentary entitled “The Food That Made Billions”, Michael Bellas from the Beverage Marketing Corporation, asserted that “When you held a Perrier bottle up, it said something about yourself, it said you were sophisticated, you…understood what was happening in the world. It was a perfect beverage for the young up and coming business executives, the trend-setters.” Entering into a world where “lunch was for wimps”, in the early 1980’s Perrier represented a way for the go-getters to keep their penthouses whilst those around them were losing theirs.

So why the sudden comeback amongst hipsters? What’s changed to move us away from the dreamy romance of San Pellegrino, to the sexy je ne sais quoi of Perrier? Perhaps the astute sharpness required to thrive in the online world – crafting 140 character tweets, bit.ly-ing the correct links, remembering your App Store password – relies on the kind of chicly hydrated thinking Perrier seems to exude. And let’s face it, the alluring emerald curves of Perrier just sit so much better next to the iPad compared to a crusty bottle of Highland Spring.

Whatever the reason, Perrier is back from its 14 year hiatus, today announcing the extension of its new global marketing campaign to North America. According to Ad Age, the effort aims to “attract a younger demographic of 24- to 35-year-olds” – the MTV generation just old enough to feel nostalgic for the 80’s glamour of Perrier, but just young enough to re-appropriate the brand in their own image. Hipster or otherwise.

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